Postcards

Daydreams 20 Postcards – A Review

Disclaimer – Please read this disclosure about my use of affiliate links which are contained within this post.
Daydreams 20 Postcards are illustrated by Hanna Karlzon, published by Gibbs Smith and are from my personal collection. These postcards are taken from Hanna’s original colouring book Daydreams (reviewed by me here), there is also an artist’s edition available, reviewed by me here. This postcard book contains 20 postcards, it’s paperback with thick card covers and a black tape binding. The cover is the same colour and design as the original book but printed on a smaller scale with the same luxurious gold foil accents and writing on the spine. The book has a lay flat binding meaning there is no spine to contend with so you’re able to reach and colour the entirety of the image; the postcards are easy to remove if you wish so they can be sent or gifted or even framed but they’ll stay in the book as long as you’re careful not to twist the spine. The cards are a cream colour which looks quite vintage and matches the original book pages well, it’s fairly smooth with a light texture and is perfect for blending and shading with pencils but pens glide over it seamlessly too. Alcohol markers won’t bleed if you’re careful and they don’t spread. The postcards are printed single-sided and on the reverse are printed three address lines and space for a stamp with one of 5 little doodles within it. The drawings are either centralised or those that are full-page have a line border around them that’s just a couple of millimetres thick which would make framing them nice and easy without losing any of the image. The illustrations are all scaled down from the original book and while they are drastically decreased in size (see comparison photos with the book below), none are impossible to colour and all will look beautiful when finished. The image content is very nature-based and none of Hanna’s human drawings have been included. There also aren’t many gems at all. The illustrations include birds, insects, plants, flowers, leaves, buildings, rabbits and lots of underwater scenes and creatures. They’ve all got a bit of added whimsy and fantasy which is a huge part of what gives Hanna’s images such charm and sets them apart from others.

In terms of mental health, these postcards are just perfect! Postcards offer a perfect smaller project which is less daunting to start and takes far less time to make progress on or finish than a full book page. The card is ideal for using any mediums and because they’re single-sided they’re perfect for framing so you can brighten up your darker days by just looking at all of the wonderful pages you’ve created, a great way of lifting your spirits. These postcards are nature-based and I find this the best thing for mental health as they’re very calming and peaceful and if you struggle to conjure up colour palette ideas you can just go with the one nature already created or spice things up a little if you’re feeling brave. The line thickness is consistently thin throughout but it’s not spindly thin. The intricacy and detail levels are pretty high due to these images being scaled down from the book but none of the spaces are impossible to colour. You will need fairly good vision and fine motor control to get the most out of these postcards. As for concentration level, these pages are ideal because their smaller size means they take less concentration and you can focus on individual aspects if you prefer and colour just one bird or one dragonfly rather than focusing on the whole picture at once. These postcards are ideal for good and bad days, they’re a manageable size and I personally find them very inspiring and easy to get into without having to stress over colours for hours, I can just dive right in. If you need any inspiration then just search online using Hanna’s name or the book title and you’ll find heaps of ideas to get you going!

Overall, I would highly recommend these postcards, they’re a lovely new format using Hanna’s original illustrations and they’re perfect for days when you’re feeling poorly, down, or your concentration is waning. They make an ideal project to send to others, to frame, or to keep in the book and they’re truly beautiful even just to look through uncoloured!

If you’d like to purchase a set they’re available here:
Amazon UK – Daydreams 20 Postcards
Book Depository Worldwide – https://www.bookdepository.com/Daydreams-20-Postcards-Hanna-Karlzon/9781423645597/?a_aid=colouringitmom

The image below was coloured using Prismacolor Premier Colored Pencils.

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Millie Marotta’s Wild Savannah: 50 Colouring In Postcards – A Review

Disclaimer – Please read this disclosure about my use of affiliate links which are contained within this post.
Millie Marotta’s Wild Savannah: 50 Colouring In Postcards is published and kindly sent to me to review by Batsford Books. As many of you know, I’m a huge fan of Millie’s work and this set of postcards doesn’t disappoint! They come in a lovely presentation box made of very thick card and covered in the same green colour inside and out as the spine of the original edition of Wild Savannah (you can read my review of that book here) and a scaled down version of the cover, complete with gold foiling, on the front. There are two sets of postcards, one including 30 postcards and the larger set containing 50 which is the set I’m reviewing here (do check listings carefully to make sure you’re getting the set you want). As stated before, this set contains 50 postcards, I expected there to be some duplicates but they’re all different and all beautiful! Some of the postcards are portrait, others are landscape. Some are of the whole original image scaled down and others are of sections of the original image at the original size so there is a real variety of intricacy levels from intricate to VERY intricate – the majority of the postcards are the same size as the originals or thereabouts. A few of the images do look incredibly challenging to colour, especially those that are whole animals filled with flowers and leaves because they’re so teeny tiny. The postcards are all standard postcard size and are printed onto bright white, smooth, thick card which didn’t bleed or shadow at all when I used my water-based pens. The back is left completely blank with no address lines or anything and just the name of the book in the bottom left hand corner. These postcards would be ideal to send or frame or even be used for craft projects!

In terms of mental health, as with all of Millie’s illustrations, they are really calming and great for dealing with anxiety and low mood. Because all of the images are natural and animal based, they are great for relaxing you and the intricacy and detail levels are perfect for keeping you absorbed in the task and distracted from any difficult thoughts or feelings you may be having. The images used are a wonderful selection from the original images and I didn’t notice any of my personal favourites missing. The size of each image means that colouring one doesn’t have to take days and you could easily finish one in a couple of hours with pens or take a little more time with pencils and really get blending and shading. You could even practice some backgrounds on some of the images with larger open spaces. These postcards are definitely for those of you with good vision and fine motor control, as with Millie’s books, they’re very detailed and the linework is thin so there isn’t much room for error however, the majority are perfectly colourable for those of you that can cope with detail and thin lines and they’re ideal for those of you who are already fans of Millie’s work as they absolutely don’t disappoint. The postcards have a multitude of uses and can be coloured and kept in their beautiful presentation box, sent to friends and family (in an envelope to protect them whilst in the post), framed coloured or even uncoloured in single or multiple frames and could be incorporated into craft projects. They’re much more versatile than a book and there’s no need to worry about bleed-through because not only are they printed on thick card, they’re also single-sided. If you already have Millie’s books, these are the same illustrations as Wild Savannah, with no new additions, however, they don’t feel samey and are a really beautiful, new way of presenting the images and their versatility means that they’re almost given a new lease of life. These postcards were sent to me to review but even if they hadn’t been, I’d have bought them out of my own pocket (like I did with the Animal Kingdom postcards) despite already having a copy of the Wild Savannah book because they’re so lovely and have their own merits and uses.

I can’t recommend these postcards highly enough. I don’t know the difference between the 30 set and 50 set so I can’t advise whether getting both would be a good idea because it may be the case that the 50 set has 20 new images in comparison to the 30 set or they could both be completely different. My personal recommendation would be to get this, the larger set, because you’re getting so many more postcards for not a lot more money. The whole product feels luxurious from the gold foiling on the front to the green coloured inside and the golden ribbon that you can lift out the postcards with. The postcards are printed very crisply and no corners have been cut in production. This is a beautiful item that I’m so pleased I got to review because they’re just gorgeous!

If you’d like to purchase a set of postcards, they’re available here:
Amazon UK – Millie Marotta’s Wild Savannah: 50 Colouring In Postcards
Book Depository Worldwide – http://www.bookdepository.com/Millie-Marotts-Wild-Savannah-Millie-Marott/9781454710103/?a_aid=colouringitmom

The image below was coloured using Stabilo Point 88 Fineliners and Staedtler Triplus Fineliners.

Harry Potter Magical Creatures Postcard Colouring Book – A Review

Disclaimer – Please read this disclosure about my use of affiliate links which are contained within this post.
Harry Potter Magical Creatures Postcard Colouring Book is published and very kindly sent to me to review by Studio Press Publishing. This is the postcard book of the Harry Potter Magical Creatures Colouring Book, reviewed by me here. This book contains 20 postcards of single page images from the book that have been scaled down from the originals to fit on the 16.2x12cm pages. The postcards are standard size and have a lay flat binding which makes them easy to remove when you wish but is sturdy enough to keep the postcards in place while you’re colouring and for if you wish to keep them as a complete book. The covers are made of thick card with green tape down the spine, the cover image is the same as the original book so it’s easy to tell which postcard set matches which book. The back of each postcard has a patterned border (these vary a little throughout), an outline for a stamp and four address lines accented by a feather quill with a small varying symbol in the centre. Each of the 20 images is taken directly from the book and scaled down to fit the page rather than being smaller sections of the original design. The card itself is bright white and lightly textured (it’s a little different from the card used for the Harry Potter Postcard Colouring Book reviewed by me here), the card is fairly absorbent so when using water-based pens be careful of spreading and be aware that the colours appear a little darker than usual, I didn’t experience any bleed-through or shadowing at all. Pencil works well and you can build up plenty of layers or colour in blocks with no white tooth left. The images are printed single-sided and are a fairly good selection from the originals, only a couple of the images are the wallpaper-style patterned images which feel a bit like filler images, the rest are very good stand-alone images which you’ll love colouring! A great selection of creatures is depicted including centaurs, Buckbeak, Fluffy the three-headed dog, Fawkes the phoenix, Hedwig, and many more (all pages are photographed below).

In terms of mental health, this book doesn’t have an awful lot of impact on it unless you’re a Harry Potter Mega Fan in which case it’s likely to considerably lift your mood and give you hours and hours of distraction and enjoyment. If you enjoyed the Harry Potter Magical Creatures Colouring Book then you’re highly likely to enjoy these postcards and the different scale offers different opportunities for colouring the images again and being able to frame or gift them and they’re a much more manageable size for bad days when your concentration or focus are poor and you need a quick colouring fix. The images still take a fairly long time to colour if you want them to look realistic, especially if you use pencils but they’re considerably quicker than the book pages were. The line thickness varies but is a lot thinner than the book and ranges from medium to spindly thin but mostly it remains thin so you will definitely need good vision and fine motor control to get the most out of these postcards. There aren’t any pre-coloured inspiration images in this postcard book like there were in the original but you can easily google the creatures to find images of them from the films to work out exactly how to colour them so they look true to the film, or you can go it alone and try out your own colour schemes, it doesn’t have to be realistic, remember it’s a magical world! Some of the illustrations are very intricate and detailed and others are much simpler with larger open spaces so the postcards do have a variety of difficulty levels to accommodate your good and bad days.

I would highly recommend these postcards to Harry Potter fans and to fans of the Harry Potter Magical Creatures Colouring Book, they are great fun to colour and would be ideal to incorporate into craft projects, frame for a Harry Potter themed room, or gifting to others to share the magical love.

If you’d like to purchase a copy it’s available here:
Amazon UK – Harry Potter Magical Creatures Postcard Colouring Book
Book Depository Worldwide – http://www.bookdepository.com/Harry-Potter-Magical-Creatures-Postcard-Book-Warner-Bros/9781783705955/?a_aid=colouringitmom

The image below was coloured using Faber-Castell Polychromos Pencils.

Harry Potter Postcard Colouring Book – A Review

Disclaimer – Please read this disclosure about my use of affiliate links which are contained within this post.
Harry Potter Postcard Colouring Book is published and very kindly sent to me to review by Studio Press Publishing. This is the postcard book of the Harry Potter Colouring Book, reviewed by me here. This book contains 20 postcards of single page images from the book that have been scaled down from the originals to fit on the 16.2x12cm pages. The postcards are standard size and have a lay flat binding which makes them easy to remove when you wish but is sturdy enough to keep the postcards in place while you’re colouring and for if you wish to keep them as a complete book. The covers are made of thick card with gold tape down the spine, the cover image is the same as the original book so it’s easy to tell which postcard set matches which book. The back of each postcard has a patterned border (these vary a little throughout), an outline for a stamp and four address lines accented by a feather quill with a magical symbol in the centre. Each of the 20 images is taken directly from the book and scaled down to fit the page rather than being smaller sections of the original design. The card itself is bright white and lightly textured, water-based pens are ok to use but the finished result seemed a little speckled (see photo below) rather than just a block of vibrant colour. Pencil works well and you can build up plenty of layers or colour in blocks with no white tooth left. The images are printed single-sided and are a fairly good selection from the originals but unfortunately 5 of the images are the wallpaper-style patterned images which feel a bit like filler images rather than desirable stand-alone illustrations, however, this is my personal taste and others may well love these. Each of the house crests are included as well as a few pictures of the leading characters and some illustrations of posters (all pages are photographed below). My only criticism is that the printing, at least on my copy, is off centre and all of the images, including the backs of the postcards aren’t central and are instead shifted to the right towards the outside edge, this isn’t a major issue but it did bother my perfectionism and would make framing them a bit of a challenge if you were wanting to do that (do check other copies as this may have been rectified and could be an isolated issue).

In terms of mental health, this book doesn’t have an awful lot of impact on it unless you’re a Harry Potter Mega Fan in which case it’s likely to considerably lift your mood and give you hours and hours of distraction and enjoyment. If you enjoyed the Harry Potter Colouring Book then you’re highly likely to enjoy these postcards and the different scale offers different opportunities for colouring the images again and being able to frame or gift them and they’re a much more manageable size for bad days when your concentration or focus are poor and you need a quick colouring fix. The images still take a fairly long time to colour if you want them to look realistic, especially if you use pencils but they’re considerably quicker than the book pages were. The line thickness varies but is a lot thinner than the book and ranges from medium to spindly thin but mostly it remains thin so you will definitely need good vision and fine motor control to get the most out of these postcards. There aren’t any pre-coloured inspiration images in this postcard book like there were in the original but you can easily google the scenes, objects or creatures to find images of them from the films to work out exactly how to colour them so they look true to the film, or you can go it alone and try out your own colour schemes with bright pink robes, purple phoenixes and sparkly green snitches – it doesn’t have to be realistic, remember it’s a magical world! Some of the illustrations are very intricate and detailed and others are much simpler with larger open spaces so the postcards do have a variety of difficulty levels to accommodate your good and bad days.

I would highly recommend these postcards to Harry Potter fans and to fans of the Harry Potter Colouring Book, they are great fun to colour and would be ideal to incorporate into craft projects, frame for a Harry Potter themed room, or gifting to others to share the magical love.

If you’d like to purchase a copy it publishes on the 30th of June and is available to pre-order here:
Amazon UK – Harry Potter Postcard Colouring Book
Book Depository Worldwide – https://www.bookdepository.com/Harry-Potter-Postcard-Colouring-Book-Warner-Brothers/9781783705948/?a_aid=colouringitmom

The image below was coloured using Marco Renoir Coloured Pencils.

The Menagerie Postcards – A Review

Disclaimer – Please read this disclosure about my use of affiliate links which are contained within this post.
The Menagerie Postcards is illustrated by Claire Scully and Richard Merritt, and published and very kindly sent to me to review by LOM art, an imprint of Michael O’Mara Books. This book of postcards contains 20 scaled down illustrations from the hugely popular The Menagerie (reviewed by me here). The postcards are standard size and have a lay flat binding which makes them easy to remove when you wish but is sturdy enough to keep the postcards in place while you’re colouring and for if you wish to keep them as a complete book. The covers are made of thick card with black tape down the spine, the signature bear image is pictured on the front with bronze foiling. None of the image is lost into the spine and the whole thing is fully colourable. The back of each postcard has a dotted outline for a stamp and four address lines. Each of the 20 images has elements of the animal and in some cases the background foliage embellished with bronze foiling which really adds a touch of luxury to these postcards. The card itself is bright white and smooth, water-based pens colour brilliantly on this with no sideways bleeding, bleed through or shadowing. Unfortunately, pencils don’t colour well on this card because it’s just too smooth and there’s no tooth so they don’t layer or blend well and I found my normally vibrant colours looked very dull and flat. The images are printed single-sided and are a great selection from the original images from The Menagerie, most of the favourites are included from the bear to the fox, tiger to lion, elephant to rhino and even the llama! The only original image that I personally was disappointed isn’t included was the highland cow because I think that would have looked wonderful with bronze foiling but we can’t have it all! The images have been scaled down well and are of course much smaller but they’re definitely still colourable though you may need to change your technique for these smaller versions.

In terms of mental health, this book is lovely, it’s really natural and there is so much detail that it really draws you in and focuses you on the here and now rather than your symptoms or thoughts. The line thickness is consistent throughout at spindly thin so there is no room for manoeuvre and you’ll easily colour over the lines so this is definitely a postcard set for those of you with very good vision and fine motor control. The intricacy and detail levels do vary from very detailed to extremely, super teeny tiny, microscopic detail that is a struggle to see, let alone colour. However, don’t despair, while you certainly won’t be able to colour within each teeny tiny section, you can easily colour over the smallest details and use them as texture underneath your colouring. Many of the images are fully colourable but around 50% of them do have areas that are filled with miniscule detail and while this didn’t interfere with my enjoyment of the postcards at all, it’s just something to be aware of, especially as pencils don’t work so well on this card. These illustrations are so detailed that you can’t help but practice mindfulness and focus intently on colouring each section carefully and neatly and this really helps you to get out of your head and away from difficult thoughts. While these images are small in size, they take a surprisingly long time to colour so you’re certainly getting value for money and you will need pretty good concentration and lighting to get the most out of these. As a side note, they would look beautiful framed either coloured or uncoloured, especially with the luxurious bronze foiling.

I would highly recommend this postcard book to fans of The Menagerie who have very good vision and fine motor control. Pen lovers will find these postcards ideal but you’ll definitely need to stick to the finest of fineliners to stay within the lines and keep the images looking crisp. These postcards are beautiful and other than not being well suited to pencils, they’re pretty much perfect!

If you’d like to purchase a copy of this book it’s available here:
Amazon UK – The Menagerie Postcards
Book Depository Worldwide – http://www.bookdepository.com/The-Menagerie-Postcards-Richard-Merritt-Claire-Scully/9781910552346/?a_aid=colouringitmom

If you can’t get enough of The Menagerie then you can get the book here:
My Review – The Menagerie: Animal Portraits to Colour
Amazon UK – The Menagerie: Animal Portraits to Colour
Book Depository Worldwide – http://www.bookdepository.com/Menagerie-Richard-Merritt/9781910552155/?a_aid=colouringitmom

The image below was coloured using Stabilo Point 88 Fineliners and Stabilo 68 Fibre-tips.

Lost Ocean: 50 Postcards to Colour and Send – A Review

Disclaimer – Please read this disclosure about my use of affiliate links which are contained within this post.
Lost Ocean Postcard Edition: 50 Postcards to Colour and Send is published and was kindly sent to me to review by Virgin Books. It is with a heavy heart that I have to write a less than positive review of these postcards, I had high hopes for them but when they arrived I’m afraid to say I was very disappointed. This box of postcards contains 50 scaled down images from Johanna Basford’s hugely successful Lost Ocean adult colouring book (reviewed by me here). Each postcard is printed single-sided with a leaf-outlined stamp space and space for an address (left blank with no lines) on the back so that you can send them to family, friends and loved ones. The postcards arrive in a beautiful presentation box made of very thick card and covered in cream paper with a scaled down version of the book cover, complete with gold foiling on the front, and a black background white line drawn pattern inside and around three quarters of the outside edge.

There are two sets of postcards, one including 36 postcards in a book and the larger set containing 50 in a presentation box which is the set I’m reviewing here (do check listings carefully to make sure you’re getting the set you want). As stated before, this set contains 50 postcards, all of which are unique with no duplicates and they are beautiful to look at. The majority of the postcards are landscape, and a few are portrait (5), they measure 16×11.2cm (a little smaller than the SG and EF postcards – see photo below). Some are of the whole original image scaled down and others are of sections of the original image that have been shrunk a little so there is a real variety of intricacy levels from very intricate to virtually impossible to colour – the majority of the postcards are nowhere near the same size as the original illustrations with some being shrunk from 22.5cm across to just 9.5cm so you can imagine just how small these are.

The postcards are made of thick, cream card which doesn’t bleed with water-based pens. The cards are a much yellower colour than the Secret Garden and Enchanted Forest Postcards and books (see comparison photo below). I’m personally not overly keen on this yellowy cream colour and feel that it makes the cards look almost dirty. Strangely, the cream appears to have been printed onto originally white card because in a few places it’s blotchy and there are even small white circular printing errors on a few (see image below), the edges of the cards are white. Because the colour has been printed on, water-based pens don’t colour smoothly or evenly and are almost repelled by the surface causing a much paler colour and a patchy appearance (see photo below – I will definitely be avoiding pens on these cards because of this). The postcards are lightly textured and take pencils well so you can build up plenty of layers though there isn’t much space within the designs to blend or shade unless you want to colour over the lines. The line thickness is spindly thin and sadly, this is where the problem is. I have very good vision for small, close things, and also have very good fine motor control but the images on these postcards are so tiny that they’re almost impossible to colour and I went over the lines a number of times. Fineliners don’t colour well on this card and even those with 0.3mm and 0.4mm nibs were sometimes too thick to colour the pictures neatly. This is such a shame because I’m a huge fan of Johanna’s images and I just love her books but scaling down the images to postcard size really wasn’t a sensible choice because it’s so limiting. The postcards are beautiful to look at and would be gorgeous to send or display as they are but given that they’re sold as colouring postcards, I expect to be able to colour them and I just haven’t found that possible to do as neatly as I’d like to. I had assumed that the images would include full-size zoomed in sections of the original images so that you can still blend and shade with pencils and use felt-tips or fineliners but because the images have been shrunk they’re just too small to colour (see the photos below where I’ve shown a 0.4mm Stabilo nib for scale).

Unfortunately, from a mental health perspective I really can’t recommend these. I have perfect vision (no glasses needed yet) and fine motor control and really struggled to colour them and found it quite stressful because I just couldn’t get it to look right. Intricate is an understatement when describing these images – they’re so detailed and tiny and while this makes them really interesting to look at, I would have to say that they’re really not well designed for colouring (I coloured one of the largest, least detailed images and still really struggled). You can’t even make copies of them and blow them up larger because the copyright instructions strictly prohibit this. All in all, I’m afraid I’m really disappointed. It’s such a shame these postcards didn’t follow the format of the Secret Garden Postcards, or those of Millie Marrotta’s Animal Kingdom and Tropical Wonderland which had very few uncolourable images due to them being zoomed in sections of the illustrations, a much more sensible and usable format. My recommendation would be to get the book of Lost Ocean which is currently half price on Amazon and half the price of this postcard set, it contains many more images, none of which are impossible to colour. These postcards would look beautiful framed as they are but for me, they’re just not suitable for colouring, I’m deeply disappointed.

If you’d still like to purchase them or view them online, they can be found here.
Amazon UK – Lost Ocean Postcard Edition: 50 Postcards to Colour and Send
Book Depository Worldwide – http://www.bookdepository.com/Lost-Ocean-Postcard-Edition-Johann-Basford/9780753557372/?a_aid=colouringitmom

The book of Lost Ocean can be found here:
Review – Lost Ocean
Amazon UK – Lost Ocean: An Inky Adventure & Colouring Book
Book Depository Worldwide – http://www.bookdepository.com/Lost-Ocean-Johann-Basford/9780753557150/?a_aid=colouringitmom

The image below was coloured using Faber-Castell Polychromos Pencils. The partially coloured image was coloured using Stabilo Point 88 Fineliners which were repelled by the surface of the card.

The One and Only Elephant Parade Postcard Colouring Book – A Review

Disclaimer – Please read this disclosure about my use of affiliate links which are contained within this post.
The One and Only Elephant Parade Postcard Colouring Book (One and Only Colouring / One and Only Coloring) is published and was kindly sent to me to review by Phoenix Yard Books who have partnered with Elephant Parade. This book is a really unusual concept with 30, large-scale postcards being printed with designs taken from 30 of the Elephant Parade statues that have toured capital cities around the world in order to raise awareness and funds for the charity Elephant Parade who work on elephant conservation, this book is being sold in aid of this work. This book is much larger than most postcard books at 22 x 14.6cm. The book is paperback with a flexible card cover with a partially coloured design from inside, the spine is glue and string bound and is quite tight to begin with but it does break fairly easily and become flatter for easier colouring. The postcards are perforated and can be easily removed before or after colouring in order to send to friends and family or to be framed. The back of each postcard has space for a postage stamp, address lines and a full colour image of the elephant statue that the design has been taken from as well as the name of it and the artist’s name (the original statues have each been painted by a different artist or celebrity). The postcards are printed on bright white, medium thickness, bendy card which has a very slight tooth for pencils and didn’t bleed or shadow at all with water-based pens but it will bleed with alcohol markers so do bear that in mind when colouring to post them to others.

The images themselves are incredibly varied and at first, before reading about the content, I found this a really odd mix from elephant to cakes, pigs to trees, triangles to scenes and so much more. Once I read the backstory to the book and discovered the message behind them and the elephant statues they were based on, the whole book suddenly got much more cohesive and felt like it had a real purpose. Seeing the original elephants in the small pictures on the back of the postcards and in larger scale on the Elephant Parade website, really helped me to understand the images and also gave great inspiration for future colour schemes as you could easily copy the original, or create your own.

In terms of mental health, this book of postcards is ideal if you like variety. The images aren’t particularly cohesive, though variety does bind them together and the fairly high number of images which include elephants in one way or another. The line thickness varies throughout from a couple of spindly thin images to some much thicker medium and even thick lines so this book is most definitely suitable for all of you with fluctuating conditions. The levels of intricacy and detail also vary throughout from very detailed and intricate images filled with lots of teeny tiny sections to colour, all the way to much larger open spaced images and everything in between, this book really does encapsulate variety! Postcards are ideal for days when you’re feeling pretty poorly and can’t cope with a full book page but still want to finish your colouring in one sitting. Because these postcards are larger than normal, it makes them great for those who find normal postcards a little too fiddly to manoeuvre and colour and they require less concentration and effort than book pages do. The images are of all sorts of things and there’s sure to be something to suit everyone from food to animals, natural to the surreal and they’re definitely distracting for those days when your symptoms get a bit much to handle.

I would highly recommend these postcards to anyone who likes variety, colouring postcards, and who wants to do their bit to help elephants worldwide. This is a lovely book with some really lovely illustrations inspired by the Elephant Parade statues and it’s sure to brighten your day!

If you’d like to purchase a copy it’s available here:
Amazon UK – The One and Only Elephant Parade Postcard Colouring Book (One and Only Colouring / One and Only Coloring)
Book Depository Worldwide – http://www.bookdepository.com/The-One-and-Only-Elephant-Parade-Postcard-Coloring-Book-null/9781907912948/?a_aid=colouringitmom

The image below was coloured using Stabilo 68 Fibre-tips.